Fab Four: Taylor Silver

Taylor Silver lives in New York City. She’s the assistant music editor for The Le Sigh. You can read her unrequited tweets to Cher @taylorgayng.

Modern Girl by Sleater-Kinney


I exclusively listened to Sleater-Kinney my second semester of college, when I was at my most depressed and anxious. A few months ago though, my friend had just finished reading Carrie Brownstein’s memoir. She asked me to give her a stick ‘n’ poke, so I tattooed “Modern Girl” on her bicep. For years, I associated the song with a very lonely time, but now it just makes me think of her and how she helped dig me out. Continue reading “Fab Four: Taylor Silver”

Dance Away The Pain: The Julie Ruin’s Hit Reset

Rating: 4/5

The undeniable force that is Kathleen Hanna struck again earlier this month after her latest band, The Julie Ruin, released its second album titled Hit Reset. As an artist Hanna is used to touching on heavy, political subjects, her main target being the patriarchy, but on Hit Reset she brings the pain home with her–literally. As the house on the front cover would indicate, the new album delves into pain Hanna experienced in childhood. This pain is particularly present in the opening verse of the album’s title track, where lyrics such as “slept with the lights on on the floor/Behind a chair that blocked the door” paint a picture of a life filled with anxiety and paranoia. Continue reading “Dance Away The Pain: The Julie Ruin’s Hit Reset”

Review: Please Kill Me by Legs McNeil & Gillian McCain

Rating: 5/5

Funny story. I first heard about Please Kill Me in an episode of Gilmore Girls called “Teach Me Tonight.” In the episode Jess recommends the book to Rory as a way to distract her from the studying they’re supposed to be doing. As a die hard GG fan, I take the book recommendations on this show seriously. So when I found a copy of the book at Barnes & Noble, I bought it immediately.51G3XZDQ5AL

I devoured Please Kill Me by the beach over winter break. Every so often my concentration would break away from its pages, and, regaining awareness of where I was, I’d marvel at how different vibes of the book were from my surroundings.

As its subtitle states Please Kill Me offers an “uncensored oral history of punk,” emphasis on uncensored. The amount of honesty in the book is baffling. People proudly admit  to all forms of depravity and give salacious testimonies about their friends and enemies alike. At its best, the book makes you feel like you’re backstage, privy to all the gossip and drama of the sex, drugs, and rock and roll lifestyle. Continue reading “Review: Please Kill Me by Legs McNeil & Gillian McCain”